WORLD’S FINEST

Superman 01 Batman 01

May these two only fight evil.

Superman was created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster.

Batman was created by Bob Kane and Bill Finger.

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BATGIRL OF BURNSIDE Redux

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Although I’d posted some pics of this Batgirl before, Tony Martins (@TonyM_Photo) took these much-improved photos. This 1/6th scale figure was sculpted with a mixture of  Sculpey Firm and Apoxie over an aluminum foil armature, primed, and painted with acrylic paints and Cel-Vinyl.

I based this pose on the cover of her first appearance in Detective Comics #359, as drawn by Carmine Infantino, with additional design input by John Vukelic. This was done for the 6th Annual Hub Comics DARK KNIGHT ON A DARK NIGHT Batman art show.

Batgirl was created by Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino, and redesigned by Cameron Stewart and Babs Tarr  (and you can see where Babs Tarr autographed it under the Batgirl logo in that last picture!).

John Henry Irons, STEEL

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From a recent photoshoot with Tony Martins (@TonyM_Photo), this is Steel. This 1/9th scale figure was sculpted with a mixture of Super Sculpey  over an aluminum foil  armature, primed and painted with acrylic paints.

When Superman was (briefly) killed by the monster Doomsday back in 1993, construction worker John Henry Irons was trapped by falling debris from the battle. When he finally pulled himself free, he declared “Gotta stop Doomsday!” as though he had to continue the fallen Superman’s never-ending battle.

Steel Arises

Art by Jon Bogdanove, words by Louise Simonson, from The Adventures of Superman #500 (June 1993).

In subsequent comics, Steel built a suit of powered armor with which gives him superhuman strength and the power of flight, and is probably best known for the movie in which he was played by Shaquille O’Neal.

But I liked Steel best in that first appearance, where he looked for all the world like an amalgamation of two American myths, John Henry and Superman.

Steel was created by Louise Simonson and Jon Bogdanove.

Batgirl of Burnside

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I was excited by the new creative team on BATGIRL- writer/breakdown artist Cameron Stewart, co-writer Brenden Fletcher, artist Babs Tarr, colorist Maris Wicks and letter Jared K. Fletcher– and I wanted to sculpt Barbara Gordon in her new costume.

I based this pose on the cover of her first appearance in Detective Comics #359, as drawn by Carmine Infantino, with additional design input by John Vukelic. This was done for the 6th Annual Hub Comics DARK KNIGHT ON A DARK NIGHT Batman art show.

These pictures were shot on-site in the display case. I’ll try to get some better pictures soon.

Ending 2012 with a Question

Question 001

Just about finished Rene Montoya as the Question (based on artist Cully Hamner’s version). As always, more work to be done.

Happy New Year! I hope 2013 is good for everyone.

12 DAYS OF THE BATMAN! DAY 12: THE JOKER

JOKER 006Christmas with the Joker.

Batman first battled the Joker in 1940’s BATMAN #1 in a story by Bill Finger and Jerry Robinson. The Joker was poisoning wealthy men, leaving their corpses with an eerie rictus grin, and baffling the police in the process. His first fight with Batman ended with the Batman tossed into a river, excited at the prospect of an adversary who could really hit. The rematch ended with the Joker apparently accidentally stabbing himself in the heart, laughing maniacally as he died. A last-minute editorial decision saved his life, as the medics in the ambulance were shocked that the Joker was -somehow- still alive.

Over more than 70 years, the Joker remains an enigma. Different versions hinted at his life before Batman unwittingly dropped him into a vat of bleaching chemicals, but whoever he was before is unimportant. He is the Joker; deadly, anarchic, interested only in what makes him laugh, no matter who’s hurt in the process.

My take on the Joker is fairly traditional (I’ve sculpted him before). I dislike when he’s depicted as  a physical monster. He’s hideous because he chose to be,  not because he’s disfigured. I gave him a look like he’s just thought of an especially wicked joke.

And so the Joker gets the last laugh. Thanks for looking. This has been 12 Days of the Batman.